Alturas Wildlife Sanctuary

Dominical
Costa Rica

enfrdeitptrues

July Arrivals

baby kinkajou

A Fiery-billed Aracari got hit by a car and was brought to the sanctuary last week by MINAE. It sustained a head trauma, and is being treated with anti-inflammatories. It is recovering well enough for us to be certain that it will be released shortly.

In June we received a juvenile, male kinkajou that was found abandoned in Uvita. His eyes were still shut and estimated to be around 10 days old upon arrival, only weighing 200 grams. When we find abandoned young, like this Kinkajou or Tamandua, it is possible that their mother’s may have abandoned them due to the young being sick or weak. Animals will not spend the energy to raise young if they are unsure that they will survive. Other reasons could be that their mothers were killed as a result of a road traffic accident or animal attack. Joey, as we named the kinkajou, is growing incredibly fast and has a healthy appetite for his bottle of goat’s milk.

One rare rescue that we do not see so often here at the sanctuary has been that of a Brown Booby. This sea bird was found at Playa Espadilla in Manuel Antonio area and was extremely weak. After initial inspection, our vet concluded that it had a left wing injury, preventing it from flying. It has been eating well since and has regained its strength, making us hopeful that it will be released over the next few days.

Another seabird which was recently brought to the sanctuary was a Pelican. It was mysteriously found in the mountains by Palmar, after falling down into the back yard of a man. Upon arrival, the bird was infested with fleas, showed symptoms of infection and was extremely weak. It is currently being treated with antibiotics, and de-wormer, and is now doing better and eating up to six sardines a day!

A Double-toothed Kite has arrived from San Isidro to the rehab after flying into a window, sustaining a head trauma. Our vet Sandy assumes the raptor will be releasable, but we are currently keeping it in our rehab center under observation.